Recruitment

Recruitment Status
Not yet recruiting
Estimated Enrollment
Same as current

Summary

Conditions
Role of Enteroscopy
Type
Observational
Design
Observational Model: CohortTime Perspective: Prospective

Participation Requirements

Age
Between 18 years and 80 years
Gender
Both males and females

Description

The small intestine is very essential for digestion and absorption and is presented between the stomach and large intestine. Because of its anatomical position, the small intestine was named as a "blind area" leading to difficulty in diagnosis of small bowel disease. The advant of ballon-assisted en...

The small intestine is very essential for digestion and absorption and is presented between the stomach and large intestine. Because of its anatomical position, the small intestine was named as a "blind area" leading to difficulty in diagnosis of small bowel disease. The advant of ballon-assisted enteroscopy facilitates the management of the small bowel diseases. There are several causes of obscure small intestinal disorders, which are Angioectasia (20-55%), small bowel tumours (10-20%), Cameron erosions (5-15%), NSAID enteropathy (5%), Dieulafoy lesion (2-3%), Crohn's disease (2-10%), Coeliac disease( 2-5 %), Meckel's diverticulum (2-5%), duodenal varices (1-5%), gastric antral vascular ectasia (GAVE) (1-2%), Ectopic varices (1-2%), Portal hypertensive enteropathy 1-2% (but 60-70% in those with portal hypertension), Radiation enteritis (<1% ). Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) was the most common indication for enteroscopry and is defined as a bleeding from an unknown site after a negative evaluation of the GI tract with esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) and ileocolonoscopy. OGIB represents about 5% of patients presenting with GI bleeding. OGIB isthe most common indication for enteroscopry, whatever the age groups, but the proportion of patients performing enteroscopy for OGIB was higher in elderly patients. Young patients were indicated for enteroscopy for other complains, such as abdominal pain, or suspicious small-bowel tumor. Egyptian study was done and identified that the source of OGIB in the small intestine represents 69.2%, with negative DBE ?ndings in 30.8% and the most common lesions were angioectasias followed by GI tumours (30.8%, 19.2%, respectively).

Tracking Information

NCT #
NCT04288882
Collaborators
Not Provided
Investigators
Not Provided