Recruitment

Recruitment Status
Completed
Estimated Enrollment
Same as current

Summary

Conditions
Hip; Anomaly
Type
Interventional
Phase
Not Applicable
Design
Allocation: RandomizedIntervention Model: Parallel AssignmentIntervention Model Description: A parallel design, also called a parallel group study, compares two or more treatments. Participants are randomly assigned to either group, treatments are administered, and then the results are compared.Masking: Double (Investigator, Outcomes Assessor)Masking Description: The care provider (Cathy Arnot) was not blinded as she knew the groups of the participants. The Investigators and the Outcomes Assessors were blinded as they were not aware of the group each participant was placed in.Primary Purpose: Treatment

Participation Requirements

Age
Younger than 125 years
Gender
Both males and females

Description

The goal of this study is to compare the efficacy of three clinical interventions intended to treat hip dysfunctions such as hip osteoarthritis. Physical therapists utilize mobilization with movement clinically to increase range of motion that has been limited by hip pathology. This study will compa...

The goal of this study is to compare the efficacy of three clinical interventions intended to treat hip dysfunctions such as hip osteoarthritis. Physical therapists utilize mobilization with movement clinically to increase range of motion that has been limited by hip pathology. This study will compare mobilization with movement administered by a physical therapist, self-administered mobilization with movement, in which patients are instructed in the maneuver and then perform it at home, and dynamic stretching as instructed by a physical therapist. Efficacy will be judged through changes in hip internal rotation range of motion, a motion which is typically limited in patients with hip pathology. The objectives of the study are to quantify the effects of two different modalities of hip mobilization with movement and dynamic stretching in terms of hip internal rotation increases, and to inform current physical therapy practice by filling gaps in the literature surrounding the therapeutic effects of hip mobilization with movement. This study is intended to better equip physical therapists to select the most appropriate evidence-based interventions, thereby increasing the quality of patient care.

Tracking Information

NCT #
NCT04279756
Collaborators
Not Provided
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Cathy Arnot, DPT University of South Carolina