Recruitment

Recruitment Status
Completed
Estimated Enrollment
1000

Summary

Conditions
  • Advanced Melanoma
  • Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma
  • Colorectal Cancer Metastatic
  • Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors
  • Patients With Diagnosed Malignancies Being Considered for Clinical Trials
Type
Observational
Design
  • Observational Model: Other
  • Time Perspective: Other

Participation Requirements

Age
Between 18 years and 125 years
Gender
Both males and females

Description

Somatic mutations in solid tumors represent an established means of characterizing malignancies for prognostic, diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. Mutations in EGFR, KRAS, BRAF, and KIT and PDGFRA genes direct therapy in patients with advanced lung, colorectal, melanoma, and GIST tumors, respectiv...

Somatic mutations in solid tumors represent an established means of characterizing malignancies for prognostic, diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. Mutations in EGFR, KRAS, BRAF, and KIT and PDGFRA genes direct therapy in patients with advanced lung, colorectal, melanoma, and GIST tumors, respectively. Known or novel mutations in other genes may also be of clinical significance but are not identified by current genotyping offered to BC Cancer Agency (BCCA) patients. Furthermore, numerous candidate genes have been implicated as potential prognostic and predictive biomarkers in patients with solid tumours. As such, the Oncopanel is a clinical assay being developed to determine genotype status of a prospectively defined set of genes. The following clinically relevant set of genes and exons are included in the Oncpanel: KRAS, EGFR, BRAF, NRAS and HRAS, PIK3CA Signal Transduction Pathway Genes, RAS-RAF-MEK-MAPK Pathway, HER2, IDH1 and IDH2, ALK, TP53, c-KIT, STAT1&3 and PDGFRA. Additional testing on the tumour material will also include analysis of specific gene variants associated with adverse events or response to therapy. Numerous studies have documented the presence of circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA) among patients with advanced and early stage malignancies (20-22). The ability to diagnose standard cancer mutations with a blood-based assay (a "liquid biopsy") has not yet been established but presents obvious advantages. The emergence of "resistance" mutations arising in the metastatic tumor or throughout the course of therapy is well documented (21, 22). A blood biopsy may represent more accurate determination of the tumor's genetic features than archival DNA specimen. Adequate tissue specimens can be difficult to obtain from some patients with diagnosed malignancies, particularly lung cancer. A blood biopsy may represent a less invasive and timelier means of diagnosing both standard and translational cancer mutations.

Locations

Kelowna, British Columbia, V1Y5L3
Vancouver, British Columbia, V5Z 4E6
Surrey, British Columbia, V3V 1Z2
Victoria, British Columbia, V8R 6V5
Abbotsford, British Columbia, V2S 0C2
...
Kelowna, British Columbia, V1Y5L3
Vancouver, British Columbia, V5Z 4E6
Surrey, British Columbia, V3V 1Z2
Victoria, British Columbia, V8R 6V5
Abbotsford, British Columbia, V2S 0C2

Tracking Information

NCT #
NCT02171286
Collaborators
BC Cancer Foundation
Investigators
  • Principal Investigator: Hagen Kennecke, MD British Columbia Cancer Agency
  • Hagen Kennecke, MD British Columbia Cancer Agency