Recruitment

Recruitment Status
Completed
Estimated Enrollment
50

Inclusion Criterias

Able to spend 37 consecutive days/nights in the laboratory
Non-smokers
Healthy adults with conventional and regular sleep-wake timing
...
Able to spend 37 consecutive days/nights in the laboratory
Non-smokers
Healthy adults with conventional and regular sleep-wake timing
Completion of medical, psychological, and sleep screening tests

Exclusion Criterias

Current prescription, herbal, or over-the-counter medication use
Worked night or rotating shift work within past 3 years
Donating blood within past 8 weeks
...
Current prescription, herbal, or over-the-counter medication use
Worked night or rotating shift work within past 3 years
Donating blood within past 8 weeks
Hearing impairment
History of neurological or psychiatric disorder
History of sleep disorder or regular use of sleep-promoting medication
Drug or alcohol dependency
Traveling across 2 or more time zones within past 3 months

Summary

Conditions
  • Aging
  • Circadian Disruption
  • Sleep Restriction
Type
Interventional
Design
  • Allocation: Randomized
  • Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
  • Masking: Single (Participant)
  • Primary Purpose: Basic Science

Participation Requirements

Age
Between 21 years and 70 years
Gender
Both males and females

Description

It has long been recognized that sleep patterns change with age. A common feature of aging is the advance of the timing of sleep to earlier hours, often earlier than desired. These age-related changes are found in even healthy individuals who are not taking medications and who are free from sleep di...

It has long been recognized that sleep patterns change with age. A common feature of aging is the advance of the timing of sleep to earlier hours, often earlier than desired. These age-related changes are found in even healthy individuals who are not taking medications and who are free from sleep disorders. In addition to these sleep disturbances, many older individuals curtail their sleep voluntarily, reporting similar rates of sleep restriction (sleeping less than 7 or less than 6 hours per night) when compared to young adults. Whether voluntary or not, insufficient sleep has medical, safety and metabolic consequences. In fact, converging evidence in young adults suggests that sleep restriction per se may impair metabolism, and that reduced sleep duration is associated with weight gain, obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and mortality. An understanding of how the circadian and sleep homeostatic neurobiological processes responds to increasing homeostatic sleep pressure, and the effects of sleep restriction on metabolism at different ages, should provide information on the regulation of sleep and metabolism in aging, as well as direction for future treatments. In the present study, we will study the separate impacts of chronic sleep restriction (while minimizing circadian disruption) and chronic circadian disruption (while minimizing sleep disruption) and a poor diet on metabolism.

Inclusion Criterias

Able to spend 37 consecutive days/nights in the laboratory
Non-smokers
Healthy adults with conventional and regular sleep-wake timing
...
Able to spend 37 consecutive days/nights in the laboratory
Non-smokers
Healthy adults with conventional and regular sleep-wake timing
Completion of medical, psychological, and sleep screening tests

Exclusion Criterias

Current prescription, herbal, or over-the-counter medication use
Worked night or rotating shift work within past 3 years
Donating blood within past 8 weeks
...
Current prescription, herbal, or over-the-counter medication use
Worked night or rotating shift work within past 3 years
Donating blood within past 8 weeks
Hearing impairment
History of neurological or psychiatric disorder
History of sleep disorder or regular use of sleep-promoting medication
Drug or alcohol dependency
Traveling across 2 or more time zones within past 3 months

Locations

Boston, Massachusetts, 02115
Boston, Massachusetts, 02115

Tracking Information

NCT #
NCT02171273
Collaborators
National Institute on Aging (NIA)
Investigators
  • Principal Investigator: Charles A Czeisler, PhD, MD Brigham and Women's Hospital
  • Charles A Czeisler, PhD, MD Brigham and Women's Hospital