Recruitment

Recruitment Status
Unknown status
Estimated Enrollment
72

Summary

Conditions
Acute Myocardial Infarction
Type
Interventional
Design
  • Allocation: Randomized
  • Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
  • Masking: Double (Participant, Care Provider)
  • Primary Purpose: Treatment

Participation Requirements

Age
Between 18 years and 125 years
Gender
Both males and females

Description

Acute myocardial infarction is a major cause of mortality and morbidity. Primary percutaneous coronary intervention (pPCI) is currently the most effective treatment strategy in acute myocardial infarction. However, a sizable number of patients fail to restore optimal myocardial reperfusion, mostly b...

Acute myocardial infarction is a major cause of mortality and morbidity. Primary percutaneous coronary intervention (pPCI) is currently the most effective treatment strategy in acute myocardial infarction. However, a sizable number of patients fail to restore optimal myocardial reperfusion, mostly because of the 'no-reflow' phenomenon. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an incretin hormone that regulates plasma glucose, and recently GLP-1 analogues have been introduced for the treatment of type-2 diabetes. In experimental studies, GLP-1 or its analogues protect against reperfusion injury-induced cell death. Exenatide reduces reperfusion injury in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. Liraglutide(GLP-1) is safe and effective to reduce weight,serum lipid levels and blood pressure. Liraglutide can reduce cardiac rupture (12 of 60 versus 46 of 60; P=0.0001) and infarct size (21±2% versus 29±3%, P=0.02) and improved cardiac output (12.4±0.6 versus 9.7±0.6 ml/min; P=0.002) in normal and diabetic mice. The investigators planned to research the cardioprotective effects of intravenous liraglutide administered prior to reperfusion and continued after restoration of coronary blood flow in patients with STEMI undergoing pPCI.

Locations

Beijing, Beijing, 100853
Beijing, Beijing, 100853

Tracking Information

NCT #
NCT02001363
Collaborators
Not Provided
Investigators
Study Director: Yun Dai Chen, M.D. World Health Organization