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29 active trials for Retinoblastoma

Familial Investigations of Childhood Cancer Predisposition

NOTE: This is a research study and is not meant to be a substitute for clinical genetic testing. Families may never receive results from the study or may receive results many years from the time they enroll. If you are interested in clinical testing please consider seeing a local genetic counselor or other genetics professional. If you have already had clinical genetic testing and meet eligibility criteria for this study as shown in the Eligibility Section, you may enroll regardless of the results of your clinical genetic testing. While it is well recognized that hereditary factors contribute to the development of a subset of human cancers, the cause for many cancers remains unknown. The application of next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies has expanded knowledge in the field of hereditary cancer predisposition. Currently, more than 100 cancer predisposing genes have been identified, and it is now estimated that approximately 10% of all cancer patients have an underlying genetic predisposition. The purpose of this protocol is to identify novel cancer predisposing genes and/or genetic variants. For this study, the investigators will establish a Data Registry linked to a Repository of biological samples. Health information, blood samples and occasionally leftover tumor samples will be collected from individuals with familial cancer. The investigators will use NGS approaches to find changes in genes that may be important in the development of familial cancer. The information gained from this study may provide new and better ways to diagnose and care for people with hereditary cancer. PRIMARY OBJECTIVE: Establish a registry of families with clustering of cancer in which clinical data are linked to a repository of cryopreserved blood cells, germline DNA, and tumor tissues from the proband and other family members. SECONDARY OBJECTIVE: Identify novel cancer predisposing genes and/or genetic variants in families with clustering of cancer for which the underlying genetic basis is unknown.

Memphis, TennesseeStart: April 2017
EGFR806 CAR T Cell Immunotherapy for Recurrent/Refractory Solid Tumors in Children and Young Adults

This is a phase I, open-label, non-randomized study that will enroll pediatric and young adult research participants with relapsed or refractory non-CNS solid tumors to evaluate the safety, feasibility, and efficacy of administering T cell products derived from the research participant's blood that have been genetically modified to express a EGFR-specific receptor (chimeric antigen receptor, or CAR) that will target and kill solid tumors that express EGFR and the selection-suicide marker EGFRt. EGFRt is a protein incorporated into the cell with our EGFR receptor which is used to identify the modified T cells and can be used as a tag that allows for elimination of the modified T cells if needed. On Arm A of the study, research participants will receive EGFR-specific CAR T cells only. On Arm B of the study, research participants will receive CAR T cells directed at EGFR and CD19, a marker on the surface of B lymphocytes, following the hypothesis that CD19+ B cells serving in their normal role as antigen presenting cells to T cells will promote the expansion and persistence of the CAR T cells. The CD19 receptor harbors a different selection-suicide marker, HERtG. The primary objectives of the study will be to determine the feasibility of manufacturing the cell products, the safety of the T cell product infusion, to determine the maximum tolerated dose of the CAR T cells products, to describe the full toxicity profile of each product, and determine the persistence of the modified cell in the subject's body on each arm. Subjects will receive a single dose of T cells comprised of two different subtypes of T cells (CD4 and CD8 T cells) felt to benefit one another once administered to the research participants for improved potential therapeutic effect. The secondary objectives of this protocol are to study the number of modified cells in the patients and the duration they continue to be at detectable levels. The investigators will also quantitate anti-tumor efficacy on each arm. Subjects who experience significant and potentially life-threatening toxicities (other than clinically manageable toxicities related to T cells working, called cytokine release syndrome) will receive infusions of cetuximab (an antibody commercially available that targets EGFRt) or trastuzumab (an antibody commercially available that targets HER2tG) to assess the ability of the EGFRt on the T cells to be an effective suicide mechanism for the elimination of the transferred T cell products.

Seattle, WashingtonStart: June 2019
B7H3 CAR T Cell Immunotherapy for Recurrent/Refractory Solid Tumors in Children and Young Adults

This is a phase I, open-label, non-randomized study that will enroll pediatric and young adult research participants with relapsed or refractory non-CNS solid tumors to evaluate the safety, feasibility, and efficacy of administering T cell products derived from the research participant's blood that have been genetically modified to express a B7H3-specific receptor (chimeric antigen receptor, or CAR) that will target and kill solid tumors that express B7H3. On Arm A of the study, research participants will receive B7H3-specific CAR T cells only. On Arm B of the study, research participants will receive CAR T cells directed at B7H3 and CD19, a marker on the surface of B lymphocytes, following the hypothesis that CD19+ B cells serving in their normal role as antigen presenting cells to T cells will promote the expansion and persistence of the CAR T cells. Arm A CAR T cells include the protein EGFRt and Arm B CAR T cells include the protein HER2tG. These proteins can be used to both track and destroy the CAR T cells in case of undue toxicity. The primary objectives of the study will be to determine the feasibility of manufacturing the cell products, the safety of the T cell product infusion, to determine the maximum tolerated dose of the CAR T cells products, to describe the full toxicity profile of each product, and determine the persistence of the modified cell in the participant's body on each arm. Participants will receive a single dose of T cells comprised of two different subtypes of T cells (CD4 and CD8 T cells) felt to benefit one another once administered to the research participants for improved potential therapeutic effect. The secondary objectives of this protocol are to study the number of modified cells in the patients and the duration they continue to be at detectable levels. The investigators will also quantitate anti-tumor efficacy on each arm. Participants who experience significant and potentially life-threatening toxicities (other than clinically manageable toxicities related to T cells working, called cytokine release syndrome) will receive infusions of cetuximab (an antibody commercially available that targets EGFRt) or trastuzumab (an antibody commercially available that targets HER2tG) to assess the ability of the EGFRt on the T cells to be an effective suicide mechanism for the elimination of the transferred T cell products.

Seattle, WashingtonStart: July 2020
New Strategies to Detect Cancers in Carriers of Mutations in RB1

Rationale: Individuals with a cancer predisposition due to a mutation in the paradigm tumor suppressor gene RB1, have a high risk to develop the childhood cancer retinoblastoma (Rb). Biopsies are not possible in Rb, before treatment selection. Heritable Rb patients have also a high risk to develop other types of second primary, either childhood or adult, malignancies (SPMs), notably sarcomas and melanomas. Remarkably, SPMs are now the leading cause of death in heritable-Rb-survivors. Unfortunately, there are no well-developed regular surveillance protocols for SPMs in Rb survivors available right now. Recently, new non-invasive cancer test have been developed, based on either RNA-sequencing data from platelets (ThromboSeq), or on extracellular membrane vesicles (EVs) derived from tumor cells present in blood. Objective: Determine the non-cancerous baseline in adult RB1-mutation carriers (heritable-Rb-survivors). Contribute to the biobanking of blood and cancerous tissues from RB1-mutation carriers with SPMs. The development of blood-based tests, either platelet or EV-based, for the detection of (the type of) tumors in RB1-mutation carriers. Study design: Cross-sectional multicenter trial. Study population: 40 Rb patients (children), 40 controls (children), 153 Rb survivors (adults), 153 controls (adults), 10 Rb survivors with SPM (children/adults). Main study parameters/endpoints: Determine the non-cancerous baseline in adult RB1-mutation carriers (heritable-Rb-survivors). Contribute to the biobanking of blood and cancerous tissues from RB1-mutation carriers with SPMs. Nature and extent of the burden and risks associated with participation, benefit and group relatedness: Two blood samples totalling 10ml blood will be collected for every participant. Additionally, a short questionnaire has to be filled in concerning their and their family's cancer history. Blood draws will be done, when participants are already present in the hospital for other appointments, and thus no extra visits are required. For all children, blood will be collected through an already present IV, and so no extra venepuncture is required. Children have to be included because Rb is a tumor only present in this patient group.

ParisStart: October 2018
Protocol for the Study and Treatment of Participants With Intraocular Retinoblastoma

The primary objective of this protocol is to evaluate the response rate of bilateral disease participants who have at least one eye with advanced intra-ocular retinoblastoma (stratum B) using upfront therapy with chemotherapy delivered directly to the eye. The main biology objective is to improve our understanding of the biology and tumorigenesis (how tumor develops) of retinoblastoma when biology specimens are available. As clinicians, the primary goal of the investigators for children with retinoblastoma is to provide optimal therapy using multiple treatment approaches [chemotherapy (into the vein and directly into membrane of eyeball), cryotherapy (freeze and destroy tumor), thermotherapy (laser or heat to destroy tumor), radiation therapy, and surgical removal of eye if needed) in an attempt to preserve the eye and vision whenever possible, while still curing the disease. Therefore, all children with non-metastatic retinoblastoma at St. Jude will be offered enrollment on this study. PRIMARY OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the response (complete + partial response) rate of bilateral disease participants who have at least one eye with advanced intraocular retinoblastoma (Stratum B) to two upfront courses of therapy consisting of subconjunctival carboplatin and systemic topotecan. SECONDARY OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the ocular survival of eyes and event-free survival of participants by strata. To prospectively analyze intraocular disease tissue for participants with at least one eye undergoing enucleation in order to identify the mechanism of RB1 bi-allelic inactivation. Participants may undergo upfront enucleation (due to advanced disease at diagnosis) or may receive enucleation due to progressive disease during protocol therapy.

Memphis, TennesseeStart: June 2013