300,000+ clinical trials. Find the right one.

6 active trials for Malignant Rhabdoid Tumor

Phase 2 Study of Alisertib Therapy for Rhabdoid Tumors

This study incorporates alisertib, the small-molecule inhibitor of Aurora A activity, in the treatment of patients younger than 22 years of age. Patients with recurrent or refractory AT/RT or MRT will receive alisertib as a single agent. Patients with newly diagnosed AT/RT will receive alisertib as part of age- and risk-adapted chemotherapy. Radiation therapy will be given to children ≥12 months of age. Patients with AT/RT and concurrent extra-CNS MRT are eligible. Alisertib will be administered as a single agent on days 1-7 of each 21-day cycle in all recurrent patients enrolled on Stratum A. For the patients on the newly diagnosed strata (B, C or D), alisertib will be administered in sequence with chemotherapy and radiotherapy. This study has 3 primary strata: (A) children with recurrent/progressive AT/RT or extra-CNS MRT, (B) children < 36 months-old with newly diagnosed AT/RT, (C) children > 36 months old with newly diagnosed AT/RT. Children with concurrent MRT will be treated according to age and risk stratification schemes outlined for strata B and C and will have additional treatment for local control. Children with synchronous AT/RT will be treated with age and CNS risk-appropriate therapy, and also receive surgery and/or radiation therapy for local control of the non-CNS tumor. PRIMARY OBJECTIVES To estimate the sustained objective response rate and disease stabilization in pediatric patients with recurrent or progressive AT/RT (atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumor in the CNS) (Stratum A1) treated with alisertib and to determine if the response is sufficient to merit continued investigation of alisertib in this population. To estimate the sustained objective response rate and disease stabilization in pediatric patients with recurrent or progressive extra-CNS MRT (malignant rhabdoid tumor outside the CNS) (Stratum A2) treated with alisertib and to determine if the response is sufficient to merit continued investigation of alisertib in this population. To estimate the 3-year PFS rate of patients with newly diagnosed AT/RT who are younger than 36 months of age at diagnosis with no metastatic disease (Stratum B1) treated with alisertib in sequence with induction and consolidation chemotherapy and radiation therapy (depending on age) and to determine if the rates are sufficient to merit continued investigation of alisertib in this population. To estimate the 1-year PFS rate of patients with newly diagnosed AT/RT who are younger than 36 months of age at diagnosis, with metastatic disease (Stratum B2) treated with alisertib in sequence with induction and consolidation chemotherapy and to determine if the rates are sufficient to merit continued investigation of alisertib in this population. To estimate the 3-year PFS rate of patients with newly diagnosed AT/RT who are 3 years of age or greater at diagnosis with no metastatic disease and gross total resection or near total resection (Stratum C1) treated with alisertib in sequence with radiation therapy and consolidation chemotherapy and to determine if the rates are sufficient to merit continued investigation of alisertib in this population. To estimate the 1-year PFS rate of patients with newly diagnosed AT/RT who are 3 years of age or greater at diagnosis with metastatic or residual disease (Stratum C2) treated with alisertib in sequence with radiation therapy and consolidation chemotherapy and to determine if the rates are sufficient to merit continued investigation of alisertib in this population. To characterize the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of alisertib in pediatric patients and to relate drug disposition to toxicity. SECONDARY OBJECTIVES To estimate the duration of objective response and PFS in patients with recurrent/progressive AT/RT and MRT (Strata A1 and A2). To estimate PFS and OS distributions in patients with newly diagnosed AT/RT (Strata B1, B2, B3, C1 and C2). To describe toxicities experienced by patients treated on this trial, specifically any toxicities of alisertib when administered as a single agent or in combination with other therapy over multiple courses and toxicities related to proton or photon radiation therapy. To describe the patterns of local and distant failure in newly diagnosed patients (Strata B1, B2, B3, C1 and C2). Local control relative to primary-site radiation therapy, with criteria for infield, marginal, or distant failure will also be reported descriptively.

San Diego, CaliforniaStart: May 2014
Interleukin-15 Armored Glypican 3-specific Chimeric Antigen Receptor Expressed in T Cells for Pediatric Solid Tumors

Patients may be considered if the cancer has come back, has not gone away after standard treatment or the patient cannot receive standard treatment. This research study uses special immune system cells called AGAR T cells, a new experimental treatment. The body has different ways of fighting infection and disease. No single way seems perfect for fighting cancers. This research study combines two different ways of fighting cancer: antibodies and T cells. Antibodies are types of proteins that protect the body from infectious diseases and possibly cancer. T cells, also called T lymphocytes, are special infection-fighting blood cells that can kill other cells, including cells infected with viruses and tumor cells. Both antibodies and T cells have been used to treat patients with cancers. They have shown promise, but have not been strong enough to cure most patients. Investigators have found from previous research that they can put a new gene (a tiny part of what makes-up DNA and carries your traits) into T cells that will make them recognize cancer cells and kill them. In the lab, investigators made several genes called a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR), from an antibody called GPC3. The antibody GPC3 recognizes a protein found solid tumors including pediatric liver cancers. This CAR is called GPC3-CAR. To make this CAR more effective, investigators also added a gene that includes IL15. IL15 is a protein that helps CAR T cells grow better and stay in the blood longer so that they may kill tumors better. The mixture of GPC3-CAR and IL15 killed tumor cells better in the laboratory when compared with CAR T cells that did not have IL15 .This study will test T cells that investigators made (called genetic engineering) with GPC3-CAR and the IL15 (AGAR T cells) in patients with GPC3-positive solid tumors such as yours. T cells made to carry a gene called iCasp9 can be killed when they encounter a specific drug called AP1903. The investigators will insert the iCasp9 and IL15 together into the T cells using a virus that has been made for this study. The drug (AP1903) is an experimental drug that has been tested in humans with no bad side-effects. The investigators will use this drug to kill the T cells if necessary due to side effects. This study will test T cells genetically engineered with a GPC3-CAR and IL15 (AGAR T cells) in patients with GPC3-positive solid tumors. The AGAR T cells are an investigational product not approved by the Food and Drug Administration. The purpose of this study is to find the biggest dose of AGAR T cells that is safe, to see how long they last in the body, to learn what the side effects are and to see if the AGAR T cells will help people with GPC3-positive solid tumors.

Houston, TexasStart: August 2021
Interleukin-15 and -21 Armored Glypican-3-specific Chimeric Antigen Receptor Expressed in T Cells for Pediatric Solid Tumors

Patients may be considered if the cancer has come back, has not gone away after standard treatment or the patient cannot receive standard treatment. This research study uses special immune system cells called CARE T cells, a new experimental treatment. The body has different ways of fighting infection and disease. No single way seems perfect for fighting cancers. This research study combines two different ways of fighting cancer: antibodies and T cells. Antibodies are types of proteins that protect the body from infectious diseases and possibly cancer. T cells, also called T lymphocytes, are special infection-fighting blood cells that can kill other cells, including cells infected with viruses and tumor cells. Both antibodies and T cells have been used to treat patients with cancers. They have shown promise, but have not been strong enough to cure most patients. Investigators have found from previous research that they can put a new gene (a tiny part of what makes-up DNA and carries a person's traits) into T cells that will make them recognize cancer cells and kill them. In the lab, investigators made several genes called a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR), from an antibody called GPC3. The antibody GPC3 recognizes a protein found solid tumors including pediatric liver cancers. This CAR is called GPC3-CAR. To make this CAR more effective, investigators also added two genes that includes IL15 and IL21, which are protein that helps CAR T cells grow better and stay in the blood longer so that they may kill tumors better. The mixture of GPC3-CAR and IL15 plus IL21 killed tumor cells better in the laboratory when compared with CAR T cells that did not have IL15 plus IL21 .This study will test T cells that investigators made (called genetic engineering) with GPC3-CAR and the IL15 plus IL21 (CARE T cells) in patients with GPC3-positive solid tumors. T cells made to carry a gene called iCasp9 can be killed when they encounter a specific drug called AP1903. The investigators will insert the iCasp9 and IL15 plus IL21 together into the T cells using a virus that has been made for this study. The drug (AP1903) is an experimental drug that has been tested in humans with no bad side-effects. The investigators will use this drug to kill the T cells if necessary due to side effects. This study will test T cells genetically engineered with a GPC3-CAR and IL15 plus IL21 (CARE T cells) in patients with GPC3-positive solid tumors. The CARE T cells are an investigational product not approved by the Food and Drug Administration. The purpose of this study is to find the biggest dose of CARE T cells that is safe, to see how long they last in the body, to learn what the side effects are and to see if the CARE T cells will help people with GPC3-positive solid tumors.

Houston, TexasStart: July 2022