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21 active trials for Hodgkin's Lymphoma

Study of Palifermin (Kepivance) in Persons Undergoing Unrelated Donor Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

Background: - In allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT), stem cells are taken from a donor and given to a recipient. Sometimes the recipient s immune system destroys the donor s cells. Or donor immune cells attack the recipient s tissues, called graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). This is less likely when the recipient and donor have similar human leukocyte antigens (HLA). Researchers want to see if the drug palifermin improves the results of allogeneic SCT from HLA-matched unrelated donors. Objective: - To see if high doses of palifermin before chemotherapy are safe, prevent chronic GVHD, and improve immune function after transplant. Eligibility: - Adults 18 years of age or older with blood or bone marrow cancer with no HLA-matched sibling, but with a possible HLA-matched donor. Design: Participants will be screened with medical history, physical exam, and blood and urine tests. They will have scans and heart and lung exams. Before transplant, participants will: Have many tests and exams. These include blood tests throughout the study and bone marrow biopsy. Get a central line catheter if they do not have one. Have 1-3 rounds of chemotherapy. Take more tests to make sure they can have the transplant, including medical history, physical exam, and CT scan. Get palifermin by IV and more chemotherapy. They will get other drugs, some they will take for 6 months. Participants will get the SCT. After transplant, participants will: Be hospitalized at least 3-4 weeks. Have tests for GVHD at 60 days and 6 months. These include mouth and skin photos and biopsies. Stay near D.C. for 3 months. Visit NIH 5 times the first 2 years, then yearly. They may have scans and biopsies.

Bethesda, MarylandStart: September 2015
Administration of T Lymphocytes for Hodgkin's Lymphoma and Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma (CART CD30)

The body has different ways of fighting infection and disease. No single way seems perfect for fighting cancer. This research study combines two different ways of fighting disease: antibodies and T cells. Antibodies are proteins that protect the body from diseases caused by germs or toxic substances. They work by binding those germs or substances, which stops them from growing and causing bad effects. T cells, also called T lymphocytes, are special infection-fighting blood cells that can kill other cells, including tumor cells or cells that are infected with germs. Both antibodies and T cells have been used to treat patients with cancers: they both have shown promise, but have not been strong enough to cure most patients. Investigators hope that both will work better together. Investigators have found from previous research that they can put a new gene into T cells that will make them recognize cancer cells and kill them. Investigators now want to see if they can attach a gene to T cells that will help them do a better job at recognizing and killing lymphoma cells. The new gene that investigators will put in T cells makes an antibody called anti-CD30. This antibody sticks to lymphoma cells because of a substance on the outside of the cells called CD30. Anti-CD30 antibodies have been used to treat people with lymphoma, but have not been strong enough to cure most patients. For this study, the anti-CD30 antibody has been changed so that instead of floating free in the blood it is now joined to the T cells. When an antibody is joined to a T cell in this way, it is called a chimeric receptor. These CD30 chimeric receptor-activated T cells seem to kill some of the tumor, but they don't last very long and so their chances of fighting the cancer are unknown.

Houston, TexasStart: October 2011
Use of T-allo10 in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (HSCT) for Blood Disorders

A significant number of patients with hematologic malignancies need a hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) to be cured. Only about 50% of these patients have a fully matched donor, the remaining patients will require an HSCT from a mismatched related or unrelated donor. Almost 60% of these mismatched donor HSCTs will result in graft-versus-host disease (GvHD), which can cause significant morbidity and increased non-relapse mortality. GvHD is caused by the donor effector T cells present in the HSC graft that recognize and react against the mismatched patient's tissues. Researchers and physicians at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital, Stanford are working to prevent GvHD after HSCT with a new clinical trial. The objective of this clinical program is to develop a cell therapy to prevent GvHD and induce graft tolerance in patients receiving mismatched unmanipulated donor HSCT. The cell therapy consists of a cell preparation from the same donor of the HSCT (T-allo10) containing T regulatory type 1 (Tr1) cells able to suppress allogenic (host-specific) responses, thus decreasing the incidence of GvHD. This is the first trial of its kind in pediatric patients and is only available at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital, Stanford. The purpose of this phase 1 study is to determine the safety and tolerability of a cell therapy, T-allo10, to prevent GvHD in patients receiving mismatched related or mismatched unrelated unmanipulated donor HSCT for hematologic malignancies.

Palo Alto, CaliforniaStart: August 2017
Brentuximab Vedotin (SGN-35) in Transplant Eligible Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma

The purpose of this study is determine if 2 cycles of SGN-35 can be used instead of ICE prior to autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT) for relapsed and refractory HL. There are 2 steps to treating patients with relapsed or refractory HL. The first step is to shrink the lymphoma with chemotherapy. The chemotherapy regimen commonly used is called ICE. ICE is a combination of chemotherapy drugs: ifosfamide, carboplatin, and etoposide. The second step of treatment is to give high doses of chemotherapy and radiation therapy followed by infusion of stem cells. This is called an ASCT. This study will focus on the first step of treatment for relapsed and refractory HL. ICE chemotherapy can cause many side effects. We believe that there are patients who can receive less toxic treatments and still do well. We have learned from past studies that [18F]FDG-PET scans (which we will call "PET scans") can be used to predict who will do well after ASCT. PET scans are tests used to measure the metabolic activity of the disease. Patients without abnormal activity on their PET scan (negative PET scan) before ASCT are much more likely to be cured than those with activity on their PET scan (positive PET scan). In this study, instead of beginning with ICE chemotherapy, the patient will receive a new drug called Brentuximab vedotin (SGN-35). SGN-35 is a type of drug called an antibody drug conjugate. SGN-35 has 2 parts; a part that targets cancer cells (the antibody) and a cell killing part (the chemotherapy). The antibody part of SGN-35 sticks to a target called CD30. CD30 is an important molecule on some cancer cells (including Hodgkin lymphoma) and some normal cells of the immune system. The cell killing part of SGN-35 is a chemotherapy called monomethyl auristatin E (MMAE). It can kill cells that the antibody part of SGN-35 sticks to. Compared to ICE chemotherapy, SGN-has fewer side effects and does not require inpatient admission for treatment. We aim to determine whether patients can avoid treatment with ICE prior to ASCT. We will use the results of the PET scan to determine whether the patient needs additional chemotherapy before ASCT. If the PET scan is negative, the patient will be referred to ASCT and not receive ICE chemotherapy. If the PET scan is positive, the physician will discuss further treatment options with the patient.

New York, New YorkStart: January 2012
CD30 CAR T Cells, Relapsed CD30 Expressing Lymphoma (RELY-30)

The subject has a type of lymph gland cancer called Lymphoma. The body has different ways of fighting infection and disease. No single way seems perfect for fighting cancer. This research study combines two different ways of fighting disease: antibodies and T cells. T cells, also called T lymphocytes, are special infection-fighting blood cells that can kill other cells, including tumor cells or cells that are infected with germs. Both antibodies and T cells have been used to treat patients with cancers; they both have shown promise, but have not been strong enough to cure most patients. Investigators hope that both will work better together. Investigators have found from previous research that they can put a new gene into T cells that will make them recognize cancer cells and kill them. They now want to test whether these genetically modified T cells given after chemotherapy will be more effective at killing cancer cells. The gene that will be put into the T cells makes an antibody called anti-CD30. This antibody sticks to lymphoma cells because of a substance on the outside of the cells called CD30. Anti-CD30 antibodies have been used to treat people with lymphoma, but have not been strong enough to cure most patients. For this study, the anti-CD30 antibody has been changed so that instead of floating free in the blood it is now joined to the T cells. When an antibody is joined to a T cell in this way it is called a chimeric receptor. These CD30 chimeric receptor-activated T cells (CD30.CAR T cells) seem to kill some of the tumor, but they don't last very long and so their chances of fighting the cancer are unknown. Several studies suggest that the infused T cells need room to be able to multiply and grow to accomplish their functions, and that this may not happen if there are too many other T cells in circulation. Because of that, doctors may use chemotherapy drugs to decrease the level of circulating T cells prior to the CD30.CAR T cells infusion. This is called "lymphodepletion". CD30.CAR T cells have previously been studied in lymphoma patients. What is new for this study is that lymphodepletion chemotherapy will be administered in patients who are not post autologous transplant in the hope that it will result in more durable anti-tumor effects.

Houston, TexasStart: May 2017
EBV CTLs Expressing CD30 Chimeric Receptors For CD 30+ Lymphoma

The body has different ways of fighting infection and disease. No single way seems perfect for fighting cancer. This research study combines two different ways of fighting disease: antibodies and T cells. Antibodies are proteins the protect the body from diseases caused by germs or toxic substances. They work by binding those germs or substances, which stops them from growing and causing bad effects. T cells, also called T lymphocytes, are special infection-fighting blood cells that can kill other cells, including tumor cells or cells that are infected with germs. Both antibodies and T cells have been used to treat patients with cancers: they both have been shown promise, but have not been strong enough to cure most patients. This study combines the two methods. We have found from previous research that we can put a new gene into T cells that will make them recognize cancer cells and kill them. We now want to see if we can attach a new gene to T cells that will help them do a better job at recognizing and killing lymphoma cells. The new gene we will put in T cells makes an antibody called anti-CD30. The antibody alone has not been strong enough to cure most patients. For this study, the anti-CD30 antibody has been changed so that instead of floating free in the blood it is now joined to the T cells. When an antibody is joined to a T cell in this way it is called a chimeric receptor. These chimeric receptor-T cells seem to kill some of the tumor, but they don't last very long and so their chances of fighting the cancer are unknown. We have found that T cells that are also trained to recognize the EBV virus (that causes infectious mononucleosis) can stay in the blood stream for many years. These are called EBV specific Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes. By joining the anti-CD30 antibody to the EBV CTLs, we believe that we will also be able to make a cell that can last a long time in the body and recognize and kill lymphoma cells. We call the final cells CD30 chimeric receptor EBV CTLs. T We hope that these new cells may be able to work longer and target and kill lymphoma cells. However, we do not know that yet.

Houston, TexasStart: May 2011