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194 active trials for Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma

Venetoclax, Ibrutinib, Prednisone, Obinutuzumab, and Revlimid in Combination With Polatuzumab (ViPOR-P) in Relapsed/Refractory B-cell Lymphoma

Background: Aggressive B-cell lymphomas can be cured but people with disease that resists treatment or that returns after treatment have poor outcomes with standard therapies. Indolent B-cell lymphomas are generally incurable with standard therapy and treatment is aimed at controlling symptoms and achieving a durable remissions. Researchers want to see if a combination of drugs can help patients with both aggressive and indolent B-cell lymphomas. Objective: To learn if it is safe and effective to give polatuzumab along with venetoclax, ibrutinib, prednisone, obinutuzumab, and lenalidomide to people with certain B-cell lymphomas. Eligibility: Adults ages 18 and older with relapsed and/or refractory B-cell lymphoma who have had at least one prior cancer treatment. Design: Participants will be screened with: Medical history Physical exam Assessment of how they do their daily activities Blood and urine tests Heart function test Tissue biopsy (if needed) Body imaging scans (may get a contrast agent through an intravenous (IV) catheter) Participants will have a bone marrow aspiration and/or biopsy. A needle will be put into the hipbone. Bone marrow will be removed. Participants may give blood, tissue, saliva, or cheek swab samples. They may have optional biopsies. Screening tests will be repeated during the study. Treatment will be given for up to 6 cycles. Each cycle lasts 21 days. Participants will take venetoclax and prednisone tablets by mouth. They will take ibrutinib and lenalidomide capsules by mouth. They will get obinutuzumab and polatuzumab by IV infusion. They will keep a medicine diary. Participants will visit the clinic 30 days after treatment ends. They will have follow-up visits for 5 years. If needed, they can visit their local doctor instead. They may be contacted by phone, mail, etc., for the rest of their life....

Bethesda, MarylandStart: July 2021
Leukapheresis for CAR or Adoptive Cell Therapy Manufacturing

Background: Leukapheresis is a procedure to separate and collect white blood cells. It is the first step in a treatment called CAR (chimeric antigen receptor) T-cell therapy. CAR-T therapy may be offered to people when their cancer comes back. The collected T-cells are used to make a special version of T-cells called CARs. Researchers want to collect these cells from people who may become eligible for a CAR T-cell study in the future. Objective: To identify people who have a high likelihood to benefit from CAR T-cell therapy early in their disease course and collect and store a T-cell product. Eligibility: People ages 4-39 with a form of leukemia or lymphoma that has not been cured by standard therapy Design: Participants will be screened with medical history, physical exam, and blood and urine tests. Review of existing MRI, x-ray, pathology specimens/reports or CT images may be done. On this study, participants will have leukapheresis. A needle will be placed into the arm. Blood will be collected and go through a machine. White blood cells will be taken out by the machine. The plasma and red cells will be returned to the participant through a second needle in the other arm. The procedure will take 4-6 hours. Some participants may have a central line (catheter) inserted which is needed to do the leukapheresis procedure, instead of the needles in the arms-especially if they are smaller. For a central line placement, a long thin tube is inserted through a small incision into the main blood vessel leading into the heart that would allow access to the blood to do the leukapheresis procedure. Participants cells will be processed and frozen for future use in a CAR T-cell therapy study.

Bethesda, MarylandStart: August 2017