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263 active trials for Psoriasis

A Study of Subcutaneous Risankizumab Injection for Pediatric Participants With Moderate to Severe Plaque Psoriasis to Assess Change in Disease Symptoms

Psoriasis is a chronic, systemic, inflammatory disease in which skin cells build up and develop thick, red and white scaly patches on the skin. There is an unmet medical need for effective treatment in pediatric patients and this study is being done to evaluate risankizumab in pediatric participants with moderate to severe plaque psoriasis. This study will assess the change in disease symptoms. Risankizumab is a drug being studied for the treatment for plaque psoriasis in pediatric participants. This study has 4 parts. Part 1: Participants aged 12 < 18 will receive a fixed dose of risankizumab. Part 2: Participants aged 12 < 18 will receive; Period A: Risankizumab or ustekinumab based on body weight followed by; Period B: Risankizumab or no treatment. Period C: Re-treatment with risankizumab (if needed). Part 3 and Part 4: Participants aged 6 < 12 will receive risankizumab based on body weight. Around 132 participants will be enrolled in approximately 50 sites worldwide. Risankizumab and ustekinumab are given as a subcutaneous (under the skin) injection. Parts 1, 3, and 4: Risankizumab for 40 weeks with a follow-up call 20 weeks later for a study duration of approximately 65 weeks. Part 2: Period A: Risankizumab or ustekinumab for 16 weeks. Period B: Risankizumab or no treatment for 36 weeks. Period C: Re-treatment with risankizumab for 16 weeks. Follow-up call 20 weeks later for a study duration of approximately 81 weeks. Participants from each Part who meet eligibility criteria for an open-label extension (OLE) study may continue on risankizumab for 216 additional weeks. There may be a higher burden for study participants compared to standard treatment. Participants will attend monthly visits and medical assessments will check the effect of treatment through blood tests, questionnaires, and checking for side effects.

Lodz, LodzkieStart: July 2020
Effect of Chronic Inflammation on Myocardial Perfusion and Function

Background: Heart failure (HF) is a public health burden. Studies have shown a link between inflammation, myocardial dysfunction, and HF. Researchers want to use psoriasis as a disease model of chronic inflammation to further study the link between inflammation and myocardial dysfunction. Objective: To learn if chronic inflammation affects the heart and if taking a biological medicine for chronic inflammation helps improve how the heart works. Eligibility: Adults ages 18 and older who have moderate to severe psoriasis, and healthy adult volunteers. Design: Participants will be screened with a medical history. They may take a pregnancy test. Healthy volunteers will have 1 visit. Those with psoriasis will have a second visit 1 year later. Participants may give blood samples. They may have a heart function test. They may have a heart imaging test, and may get a contrast agent. If so, it will be injected into a vein. Participants may have positron emission tomography/computed tomography tests. They will lie on their back on a padded table with their arms straight overhead. They may get radioactive drugs through an intravenous (IV) catheter. They will get stress medicines through the IV. These drugs mimic exercise and increase blood flow through the heart. Participants may have cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. The scanner is a large tube. Participants will lie on a table that slides in and out of the tube. They will get gadolinium contrast in a vein to improve the pictures. They may get stress medicines. Coils will be used to help make the pictures. Participation for healthy volunteers will last 1-2 days. Participation for those with psoriasis will last 14 months.

Bethesda, MarylandStart: June 2021
Study of Subcutaneous Risankizumab Injection Compared to Oral Apremilast Tablets to Assess Change in Disease Activity And Adverse Events in Adult Participants With Moderate Plaque Psoriasis Who Are Candidates for Systemic Therapy

Psoriasis (PsO) is a chronic disease characterized by marked inflammation of the skin that results in thick, red, scaly plaques. This study will assess how safe and effective risankizumab is compared to apremilast in adult participants with moderate plaque psoriasis. Adverse events and change in disease symptoms will be monitored. Risankizumab (Skyrizi) and apremilast are approved drugs for the treatment of moderate to severe PsO. Approximately 330 participants with moderate plaque psoriasis (PsO) will be enrolled across approximately 55 sites globally. The study has 2 periods : Period A from Baseline to Week 16, and Period B, from Week 16 to Week 52. In Period A, participants will be randomly placed into 2 groups to receive either subcutaneous risankizumab or oral apremilast for 16 weeks. In Period B, participants who received apremilast in Period A will again be randomly assigned to 1 of the 2 groups to receive either risankizumab or apremilast for 36 weeks. At weeks 28 and 40, participants considered non-responders to apremilast based on their psoriasis score will be offered to receive risankizumab. There may be a higher burden for participants in this study compared to usual standard of care. Participants will attend regular visits per routine clinical practice. The effect of the treatment will be checked by medical assessments, checking for side effects, and questionnaires.

Bad BentheimStart: June 2021
The Psoriasis, Atherosclerosis, and Cardiometabolic Disease Initiative (PACI)

Background: - Cardiometabolic diseases are medical disorders that can occur together and affect the heart. They increase the risk of developing heart disease and diabetes. One disorder, psoriasis, is an inflammation that mostly affects the skin but can affect the entire body. Another disorder, atherosclerosis, is a process in which cholesterol is gradually deposited on the wall of arteries. This causes arteries to harden and become less flexible. Many cells that cause psoriasis also cause atherosclerosis. Researchers want to look at the relationship between cardiometabolic diseases and psoriasis. Objectives: - To study the relationship between psoriasis and cardiometabolic diseases. Eligibility: - Individuals at least 18 years of age who have psoriasis. Design: Participants will be screened with a physical exam and medical history. Participants will have up to seven outpatient visits over the 4 years. The first visit will be a screening visit. Visits 2 will be12 months after visit 1. Visits 3, 4, and 5, will be scheduled yearly for the next 3 years. If participants have a psoriasis flare with more severe symptoms, they may have an extra visit. Those who leave the study early will have a final visit with the full series of tests. At visits 1, 2,and 5, and any flare visits, participants will have a physical exam and medical history. They will provide blood and urine samples, as well as optional tissue biopsies. They will also have heart function tests. Imaging studies, as well as optional photographs of affected areas, will be performed. These tests will also be performed at the final visit. At visits 3 and 4, participants will have a physical exam and medical history. They will also provide blood and urine samples, and have heart function tests.

Bethesda, MarylandStart: January 2013
Assessing Patient Confidence in Biologic Medications

In dermatology, biologic medications are used to treat conditions such as moderate-to-severe psoriasis. These medications generally function to decrease inflammation or disrupt the inflammatory cycle. Examples of biologic medications commonly used in dermatology include tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), blockers/inhibitors (etanercept, infliximab, certolizumab pegol, golimumab), interleukin 12/23 blockers (ustekinumab) and interleukin 17A blockers (secukinumab, ixekizumab). Due to biologic medication's efficacy and safety profiles, they have revolutionized dermatology and the general medical field. However, patients may be apprehensive about choosing a biologic medication for a variety of reasons. These include hearing negative information about the drug from friends or family, being nervous about injection, or seeing the drug or its side effects negatively portrayed in the media. Many patients are not aware that clinical trial evidence for biologics exist, and instead may rely on anecdotal evidence in choosing to take these medications. Because fear of the drug is inherently subjective, it can be modified with appropriate reassurance and presentation of evidence. Physicians must be able to ascertain from where the fear originates and how it can be countered. By understanding what kind of information will allow patients to be confident in their decision to take a biologic, dermatologists can improve outcomes and initiate use of this drug. Furthermore, reducing fear of side effects or adverse events may improve adherence to treatment and may improve treatment outcomes. The investigators propose this study with the goal of learning whether patients are more confident in the potential success of biologic medications in treating their psoriasis after being presented with clinical trial evidence, anecdotal evidence, or both.

Winston-Salem, North CarolinaStart: June 2017
Oral Psoriasis Treatment Adherence and Intervention Study

Response to psoriasis treatment is variable in large part because of poor adherence treatments. Studies using electronic monitors have assessed adherence to topical and injectable psoriasis treatments and to biologics, yielding critically important insights. Adherence to oral psoriasis treatments is not as well characterized but is also critical, as the therapeutic windows for these treatments are narrower than for other psoriasis treatment options. The proposed study will assess patients' adherence to oral psoriasis treatment (primarily methotrexate) and will also collect pilot data on an intervention to improve adherence. The primary hypothesis of the investigators study is that adherence to oral psoriasis treatment is poor and that a reporting intervention may improve adherence to oral psoriasis treatment. In the investigator-blinded, 6-month prospective study, patients will be randomized to standard-of-care treatment or standard-of-care supplemented with the weekly online reporting intervention. Adherence will be assessed using electronic monitors. This randomized trial will permit the investigators to determine adherence to oral psoriasis treatment, assess the relationship between adherence and psoriasis outcomes, identify factors that are associated with adherence to oral psoriasis treatment (including physician trust, confidence in the treatment plan, and depression), and obtain preliminary data on the impact of an Internet-reporting measure on patients' adherence to oral psoriasis treatment .

Winston-Salem, North CarolinaStart: April 2016
Study of Subcutaneous (Injected Under the Skin) Risankizumab to Assess Change in Disease Symptoms in Adult Participants With Moderate to Severe Plaque Psoriasis With Palmoplantar Involvement

Plaque Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease in which skin cells build up and develop scaly red and white patches on the skin. It is caused by an overactive immune system where the body attacks healthy tissue by mistake. Palmoplantar (non-pustular) plaque psoriasis (PPPsO) represents a localized form of psoriasis in palms and soles. This study will evaluate how safe risankizumab is for the treatment of plaque psoriasis with palmoplantar involvement and to assess change in disease symptoms. Risankizumab is an approved drug for the treatment of psoriasis. Study doctors put the participants in 1 of 2 groups, called treatment arms. Each group receives a different treatment. There is a 1 in 2 chance that participants will be assigned to placebo in Period A. In Period B, all the participants will receive risankizumab. Around 168 adult participants with a moderate to severe plaque psoriasis will be enrolled in approximately 55 sites across the world. Participants will receive single subcutaneous (administered under the skin) risankizumab or placebo in period A (16 weeks). In period B (36 weeks), all participants will receive subcutaneous risankizumab once every 12 weeks. There may be higher treatment burden for participants in this trial compared to their standard of care. Participants will attend regular visits during the study at a hospital or clinic. The effect of the treatment will be checked by medical assessments, blood tests, checking for side effects and completing questionnaires.

New York, New YorkStart: February 2021