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585 active trials for Pancreatic Cancer

Testing the Addition of Pembrolizumab, an Immunotherapy Cancer Drug to Olaparib Alone as Therapy for Patients With Pancreatic Cancer That Has Spread With Inherited BRCA Mutations

This phase II trial studies whether adding pembrolizumab to olaparib (standard of care) works better than olaparib alone in treating patients with pancreatic cancer with germline BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). BRCA1 and BRCA2 are human genes that produce tumor suppressor proteins. These proteins help repair damaged deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and, therefore, play a role in ensuring the stability of each cell's genetic material. When either of these genes is mutated, or altered, such that its protein product is not made or does not function correctly, DNA damage may not be repaired properly. As a result, cells are more likely to develop additional genetic alterations that can lead to some types of cancer, including pancreatic cancer. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Olaparib is an inhibitor of PARP, a protein that helps repair damaged DNA. Blocking PARP may help keep tumor cells from repairing their damaged DNA, causing them to die. PARP inhibitors are a type of targeted therapy. The addition of pembrolizumab to the usual treatment of olaparib may help to shrink tumors in patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations.

Caro, MichiganStart: October 2020
Metarrestin (ML-246) in Subjects With Metastatic Solid Tumors

Background: Metastasis is the spread of cancer from one organ to a nonadjacent organ. It causes 90% of cancer deaths. No treatment specifically prevents or reduces metastasis. Researchers hope a new drug can help. It stops cancer cells from growing and spreading further and possibly shrink cancer lesions in distant organs. Objective: To find a safe dose of metarrestin and to see if this dose shrinks tumors. Eligibility: Adults age 18 and older with pancreatic cancer, breast cancer, or a solid tumor that has not been cured by standard therapies. Also, children age 12-17 with a solid tumor (other than a muscle tumor) with no standard therapy options. Design: Participants will be screened with: blood tests physical exam documentation of disease confirmation or tumor biopsy electrocardiogram to evaluate the heart review of their medicines and their ability to do their normal activities Participants will take metarrestin by mouth until they cannot tolerate it or stop to benefit from it. They will keep a medicine diary. Participants will visit the Clinical Center. During the first month there are two brief hospital stays required with visits weekly or every other week thereafter. They will repeat some of the screening tests. They will fill out questionnaires. They will have tests of their cognitive function. They will have an electroencephalogram to record brain activity. They will have a computed tomography (CT) scan or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A CT is a series of X-rays of the body. An MRI uses magnets and radio waves to take pictures of the body. Adult participants may have tumor biopsies. Participants will have a follow-up visit 30 days after treatment ends. Then they will have follow-up phone calls or emails every 6 months for the rest of their life or until the study ends.

Bethesda, MarylandStart: October 2020
Nivolumab (Anti-PD1), Tadalafil and Oral Vancomycin in People With Refractory Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma or Liver Dominant Metastatic Cancer From Colorectal or Pancreatic Cancers

Background: A most common liver cancer in adults is hepatocellular carcinoma. Other kinds of liver cancer happen when colorectal or pancreatic cancer spreads to the liver. Researchers want to study if a combination of drugs helps people with these cancers. The drugs are nivolumab, tadalafil, and vancomycin. Objective: To investigate if nivolumab given with tadalafil and vancomycin causes liver cancer to shrink. Eligibility: Adults ages 18 years and older with hepatocellular carcinoma or metastases to the liver from colorectal or pancreatic cancer for which standard treatment has not worked Design: Participants will be screened with: Medical and cancer history Review of symptoms and ability to perform normal activities Physical exam Heart test. Some participants may meet with a cardiologist and/or have another heart test. Scan of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis Blood and urine tests Tumor sample review. This can be from a previous procedure. Participants will receive the study drugs in 4-week cycles. In each cycle participants will: Get nivolumab through a small plastic tube in the arm on Day 1. Take tadalafil by mouth 1 time every day. Take vancomycin by mouth 4 times a day. They will take it every day for weeks 1 3, then not take it for week 4. Complete a medicine diary of dates, times, missed doses and symptoms. Throughout the study, participants will repeat screening tests and will give stool samples or rectal swabs. After their last cycle, participants will have 3 follow-up visits over 3 months. Then they will be contacted every 6 months by phone or email and asked about their general well-being. ...

Bethesda, MarylandStart: June 2019