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108 active trials for Pancreas Cancer

Obtaining Solid Tumor Tissue From People Having Biopsy or Surgery for Certain Types of Cancer

Background: - Recent advances in cancer research have led to new therapies to treat the disease. It is important to continue these advances and discover new ones. To do that, researchers need tissue samples from solid tumors. This study will collect such samples from people already scheduled to have a procedure at the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (NIHCC). Objectives: - To collect tissue samples for use in studying new ways to treat tumors. Eligibility: Adults 18 years and older, with a precancerous or cancerous solid tumor who are scheduled to have surgery or a biopsy at the NIHCC. Children under the age of 18 but who are older than 2 years of age are eligible to be enrolled on the research sample collection portion of this study if they will have a biopsy or surgery as part of their medical care. Design: Before their procedure, participants will have a small blood sample taken. Some participants will undergo leukapheresis. In this procedure, blood is removed through a tube in one arm and circulated through a machine that removes white blood cells. The blood, minus the white blood cells, is returned through a tube in the other arm. The procedure takes 3-4 hours. For all participants, during the surgery or biopsy, pieces of the tumor and pieces of normal tissue near it will be removed for this study. The rest of the tumor or precancerous growth will be sent to a lab for analysis. Participants will return to the clinic about 6 weeks after the operation for a routine checkup. Some may have to return for additional follow-up.

Bethesda, MarylandStart: July 2013
Virtual Reality for GI Cancer Pain to Improve Patient Reported Outcomes

Patients with digestive tract malignancy often experience severe and unremitting abdominal pain that negatively affects physical, emotional, and social function, as well as health related quality of life (HRQOL). Therapeutic virtual reality (VR) has emerged as a promising and evidence-based treatment modality for cancer pain. Users of VR wear a pair of goggles with a close-proximity screen in front of the eyes that creates a sensation of being transported into lifelike, three-dimensional worlds. To date, VR has been limited to short-term clinical trials for cancer pain. Moreover, limited research exists on theory-based VR modalities beyond mere distraction, such as VR that employs acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) with components of biofeedback and mindfulness. To bridge these gaps, this study seeks to: (1) assess the impact of immersive VR on patient-reported outcomes (PROs), including pain, activity metrics, and opioid use among patients with visceral pain from a digestive tract malignancy; (2) assess differences in PROs, activity metrics, and opioid use between skills-based VR therapy vs. distraction VR therapy; and (3) determine patient-level predictors of VR treatment response in visceral cancer pain. To address these aims, the study will measure PROs and opioid use in 360 patients randomized among 3 groups and follow them for 60 days after enrollment: (1) an enhanced VR group receiving skills-based VR; (2) a distraction-based VR group receiving patient-selected VR videos; and (3) a VR sham control group using a VR headset with 2-D content. The results will inform best practices for the implementation of VR for visceral cancer pain management and guide selection of patient-tailored experiences.

Los Angeles, CaliforniaStart: October 2021