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700 active trials for Sarcoma

Aerosolized Azacytidine as Epigenetic Priming for Bintrafusp Alfa-Mediated Immune Checkpoint Blockade in Patients With Unresectable Pulmonary Metastases From Sarcomas, Germ Cell Tumors, or Epithelial Malignancies

Background: About one-third to one-half of all people dying of extrathoracic malignant diseases have cancer that has spread to the lungs. Surgery may help some people. But most people with pulmonary metastases do not survive long. Researchers want to see if a combination of drugs can help. Objective: To find a safe dose of Azacytidine, when taken as a fine mist that is inhaled (aerosolized Azacytidine), together with Bintrafusp Alfa to treat cancers that have spread to the lungs. Eligibility: Adults ages 18 and older who have cancer that has spread to the lungs, cannot be cured with surgery, and has not responded to standard treatments. Design: Participants will get Azacytidine by breathing treatments once a day for 3 days each week, for 3 weeks. The 3-week period is 1 cycle. Each course of treatment is 3 cycles. Once per cycle, participants will get Bintrafusp Alfa via IV. An IV is a small tube that is put into an arm vein. Participants will keep a diary of any side effects. Participants can take the study drugs for as long as they can continue treatment. Participants will have medical histories and physical exams. They will give blood, urine, and lung lining fluid samples. Tumor samples will be taken via bronchoscopy. They will have lung function tests. Participants will have an imaging scan that shows how spray particles move in their airway when they inhale. They will have tumor imaging scans of the chest and brain. Participants will have a follow-up visit 30 days after they stop treatment....

Bethesda, MarylandStart: September 2021
Association of Peripheral Blood Immunologic Response to Therapeutic Response to Adjuvant Treatment With Immune Checkpoint Inhibition (ICI) in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma or Gliosarcoma

Background: Glioblastoma (GBM) is a type of malignant glioma. These cancers are nearly always fatal. People who develop these cancers get aggressive treatments. But the tumors almost always recur. Researchers want to study people with newly diagnosed disease to learn more. Objective: To study people with newly diagnosed GBM or gliosarcoma to look at the changes in immune cells in the blood of those who take ipilimumab and nivolumab, along with temozolomide. Eligibility: Adults ages 18 and older with newly diagnosed GBM or gliosarcoma, who have had surgical removal of their tumor and have completed standard initial chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Design: Participants will be screened with the following: Medical record review Medical history Physical exam Tests to assess their nervous system and their ability to do typical activities Blood tests Tumor assessment. For this, they will have magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). They may get a contrast dye through an intravenous (IV) catheter. The MRI scanner makes noise. They will get earplugs. Electrocardiogram. It measures heart rate and rhythm. They will lie still. Sticky pads will be placed on their chest, arms, and legs. Screening tests will be repeated during the study. Treatment will be given in cycles. Each cycle lasts 4 weeks. Participants will get nivolumab and ipilimumab via IV. They will take temozolomide by mouth. They will keep a pill diary. Participants will fill out surveys about their symptoms. Participants will have follow-up visits about 60 days and 100 days after treatment ends. Then they will be contacted every 6 months for the rest of their life.

Bethesda, MarylandStart: September 2021
Vincristine and Temozolomide in Combination With PEN-866 for Adolescents and Young Adults With Relapsed or Refractory Solid Tumors

Background: The drug PEN-866 can remain in tumor cells longer than it does in normal cells. It also may be more effective than other drugs at treating Ewing sarcoma and rhabdomyosarcoma. Researchers want to learn if combining PEN-866 with other drugs can treat certain cancers in adolescents and young adults. Objective: To learn if the combination of PEN-866 with vincristine and temozolomide can be used to treat adolescents and young adults with solid tumors that have returned after or did not respond to standard treatments, or for which there are no standard treatments. Eligibility: People ages 12-39 years who have solid tumors, Ewing sarcoma, or rhabdomyosarcoma that returned after or did not respond to standard treatments. Design: Participants will be screened with a medical history, physical exam, and eye exam. They will have heart function tests. They may have imaging scans of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis. They will give blood and urine samples. They may have a tumor biopsy. Some samples will be used for genetic testing. Some screening tests will be repeated during the study. Participants will get 3 drugs for up to 18 cycles. Each cycle lasts 21 days. They will get PEN-866 and vincristine by IV infusion (a tube in their vein) on Days 1 and 8 of each cycle. They will take temozolomide by mouth on Days 1-5 of each cycle. Participants will complete questionnaires about their physical, mental, and social health. Participants will have a follow-up visit 30 days after treatment ends. They may be contacted by phone or email for the rest of their life.

Bethesda, MarylandStart: September 2021
Pomalidomide and Nivolumab in People With Virus-Associated Malignancies With or Without HIV

Background: Less toxic and more effective treatments are needed for cancers caused by viruses. These cancers include Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma, hepatocellular carcinoma, head and neck cancer, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, gastric cancer, anal cancer, cervical cancer, vaginal cancer, vulvar cancer, penile cancer, Merkel cell carcinoma, Kaposi sarcoma, and leiomyosarcoma. Researchers want to see if a combination of drugs can help. Objective: To find a safe dose of pomalidomide plus nivolumab in people with cancers caused by viruses. Eligibility: Adults ages 18 or older who have cancers caused by Epstein Barr virus (EBV), human herpes virus 8/Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus (HHV8/KSHV), human papilloma virus (HPV), hepatitis B or C virus (HBV/HCV), and Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) that have not responded to previous treatments or have relapsed, or in adults who do not want to have surgery because of disfigurement or other risks. Adults who have HIV with any CD4 T cell count are eligible. Design: Participants will be screened with blood and urine tests, scans, and heart tests. They will have a physical exam. Their ability to perform normal daily activities will be assessed. They may have a tumor biopsy. Treatment will be given in 28-day cycles. Participants will take pomalidomide as a tablet by mouth for 21 days of each cycle, for up to 24 cycles. They will get nivolumab by intravenous infusion once each cycle. They will take an aspirin each day until 30 days after their last dose of the study drugs. Participants will keep a pill diary. They will bring it to their study visit at the end of each cycle. At these visits, some screening tests will be repeated. Participants with Kaposi sarcoma will have pictures taken of their lesions. Participants will give blood and saliva samples for research. They may have optional anal and/or cervical swabs. They may have optional biopsies. Participants will have a follow-up visit 30 days after they stop taking the study drugs, then every month for 100 days. Some screening tests will be repeated. Then they may by contacted by phone every 3 months for 9 months, and then every 6 months thereafter....

Bethesda, MarylandStart: September 2021
Selinexor (KPT-330) in Combination With Temozolomide and Radiation Therapy in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma

Background: Glioblastoma is a type of brain cancer. Treatments include radiation, chemotherapy, and surgery. But survival rates are poor. Researchers think that the drug selinexor, when combined with chemotherapy and radiation, might help. Objective: To learn the highest dose of selinexor that people with brain cancer can tolerate when given with temozolomide and radiation therapy. Eligibility: People ages 18 and older with brain cancer that has not been treated with chemotherapy or radiation Design: Participants will be screened under another protocol. Before participants start treatment, they will have tests: Neurological and physical evaluations Blood and urine tests Possible CT scan or MRI of the brain if they have not had one in 3 weeks. Participants will lie in a machine that takes pictures of the body. They may have a dye injected into a vein. Surveys about their well-being Participants will have radiation to the brain for up to 6 weeks. This will usually be given once a day, Monday through Friday. Starting the second day of radiation, participants will take selinexor by mouth once a week. They will take it in weeks 1, 2, 4, and 5. The timing may be changed. Starting the first day of radiation, participants will take temozolomide by mouth once a day until they complete radiation. Participants will have blood tests once per week during treatment. Participants will have a follow-up visit 1 month after they complete treatment. Then they will have visits at least every 2 months for the first 2 years, then at least every 3 months for another year. Visits will include MRIs and blood tests. ...

Bethesda, MarylandStart: July 2020
Surgery in Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors (GISTs) for Treatment, Tumor Modeling, and Genomic Analysis

Objective: To follow people with GISTs and collect tumor tissue so that it can be studied in the lab. Eligibility: People age 6 and older who have a GIST. Design: Participants will be screened with a review of their medical records and samples. Participants will enroll in 1 other NIH study, and may be asked to enroll in 2 other optional NIH studies. Participants will have a medical history and physical exam. Data about how they function in their daily activities will be obtained. Participants may speak with a genetic counselor. They may have genetic testing. Participants will give blood samples. They may have a cheek swab. For this, small brush will be rubbed against the inside of the cheek. Participants may have a computed tomography (CT) scan of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis. Or they may have a CT scan of the chest and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the abdomen and pelvis. Participants will be monitored every 6-12 months at the NIH Clinical Center, for up to 10 years before having surgery. If they need surgery, it will be performed at the NIH. Then, they will be monitored every 6-12 months, for up to 5 years after surgery. If a participant has surgery, tumor tissue samples will be taken. If a participant does not need surgery, their participation will end after 10 years. If they have surgery, the 5-year monitoring period will restart after each surgery. ...

Bethesda, MarylandStart: October 2020