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99 active trials for Hodgkin's Lymphoma

Study of Palifermin (Kepivance) in Persons Undergoing Unrelated Donor Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

Background: - In allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT), stem cells are taken from a donor and given to a recipient. Sometimes the recipient s immune system destroys the donor s cells. Or donor immune cells attack the recipient s tissues, called graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). This is less likely when the recipient and donor have similar human leukocyte antigens (HLA). Researchers want to see if the drug palifermin improves the results of allogeneic SCT from HLA-matched unrelated donors. Objective: - To see if high doses of palifermin before chemotherapy are safe, prevent chronic GVHD, and improve immune function after transplant. Eligibility: - Adults 18 years of age or older with blood or bone marrow cancer with no HLA-matched sibling, but with a possible HLA-matched donor. Design: Participants will be screened with medical history, physical exam, and blood and urine tests. They will have scans and heart and lung exams. Before transplant, participants will: Have many tests and exams. These include blood tests throughout the study and bone marrow biopsy. Get a central line catheter if they do not have one. Have 1-3 rounds of chemotherapy. Take more tests to make sure they can have the transplant, including medical history, physical exam, and CT scan. Get palifermin by IV and more chemotherapy. They will get other drugs, some they will take for 6 months. Participants will get the SCT. After transplant, participants will: Be hospitalized at least 3-4 weeks. Have tests for GVHD at 60 days and 6 months. These include mouth and skin photos and biopsies. Stay near D.C. for 3 months. Visit NIH 5 times the first 2 years, then yearly. They may have scans and biopsies.

Bethesda, MarylandStart: September 2015
Leukapheresis for CAR or Adoptive Cell Therapy Manufacturing

Background: Leukapheresis is a procedure to separate and collect white blood cells. It is the first step in a treatment called CAR (chimeric antigen receptor) T-cell therapy. CAR-T therapy may be offered to people when their cancer comes back. The collected T-cells are used to make a special version of T-cells called CARs. Researchers want to collect these cells from people who may become eligible for a CAR T-cell study in the future. Objective: To identify people who have a high likelihood to benefit from CAR T-cell therapy early in their disease course and collect and store a T-cell product. Eligibility: People ages 4-39 with a form of leukemia or lymphoma that has not been cured by standard therapy Design: Participants will be screened with medical history, physical exam, and blood and urine tests. Review of existing MRI, x-ray, pathology specimens/reports or CT images may be done. On this study, participants will have leukapheresis. A needle will be placed into the arm. Blood will be collected and go through a machine. White blood cells will be taken out by the machine. The plasma and red cells will be returned to the participant through a second needle in the other arm. The procedure will take 4-6 hours. Some participants may have a central line (catheter) inserted which is needed to do the leukapheresis procedure, instead of the needles in the arms-especially if they are smaller. For a central line placement, a long thin tube is inserted through a small incision into the main blood vessel leading into the heart that would allow access to the blood to do the leukapheresis procedure. Participants cells will be processed and frozen for future use in a CAR T-cell therapy study.

Bethesda, MarylandStart: August 2017
Response-Adapted Therapy With Copanlisib and Rituximab in Untreated Follicular Lymphoma

Background: The disease follicular lymphoma (FL) develops when the body makes abnormal B-cells. These cells usually build up in the lymph nodes, but can also affect other parts of the body. Researchers want to see if a combination of drugs can attack the cancer cells in people with FL. Objective: To see if copanlisib plus rituximab is effective at slowing the growth of FL. Eligibility: People with FL who have not had prior treatment for their disease Design: Participants will be screened with: Medical and cancer history Physical exam Review of symptoms and ability to perform daily activities Blood and urine tests Small amount of bone marrow removed by needle in the hip bone Scans of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis. Some scans will use a radioactive tracer. Participants will get the study drugs in 28-day cycles for up to 13 cycles. Both are given as an intravenous (IV) infusion. Copanlisib is given over about 1 hour. Rituximab is given over several hours. For 1 cycle, they will get 3 weekly doses of copanlisib. For the next cycle, they will get 3 weekly doses of copanlisib and 4 weekly doses of rituximab. For all other cycles, they will get 2-3 weekly doses of copanlisib and 1 dose of rituximab. Participants will repeat some screening tests during the cycles. They will give a cheek swab and/or saliva sample and may have a tumor sample taken. After treatment, some participants will have a few follow-up visits each year for 5 years, then 1 each year. They will repeat screening tests. Other participants will be contacted by phone every few months.

Bethesda, MarylandStart: August 2019
Administration of T Lymphocytes for Hodgkin's Lymphoma and Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma (CART CD30)

The body has different ways of fighting infection and disease. No single way seems perfect for fighting cancer. This research study combines two different ways of fighting disease: antibodies and T cells. Antibodies are proteins that protect the body from diseases caused by germs or toxic substances. They work by binding those germs or substances, which stops them from growing and causing bad effects. T cells, also called T lymphocytes, are special infection-fighting blood cells that can kill other cells, including tumor cells or cells that are infected with germs. Both antibodies and T cells have been used to treat patients with cancers: they both have shown promise, but have not been strong enough to cure most patients. Investigators hope that both will work better together. Investigators have found from previous research that they can put a new gene into T cells that will make them recognize cancer cells and kill them. Investigators now want to see if they can attach a gene to T cells that will help them do a better job at recognizing and killing lymphoma cells. The new gene that investigators will put in T cells makes an antibody called anti-CD30. This antibody sticks to lymphoma cells because of a substance on the outside of the cells called CD30. Anti-CD30 antibodies have been used to treat people with lymphoma, but have not been strong enough to cure most patients. For this study, the anti-CD30 antibody has been changed so that instead of floating free in the blood it is now joined to the T cells. When an antibody is joined to a T cell in this way, it is called a chimeric receptor. These CD30 chimeric receptor-activated T cells seem to kill some of the tumor, but they don't last very long and so their chances of fighting the cancer are unknown.

Houston, TexasStart: October 2011